Skip to Main Content
Skip Nav Destination

The tight CB[n]·guest binding affinities prompted us to perform mechanistic studies of the CB[n]-forming reaction to enable the creation of new CB[n]-type receptors and assess how the structural changes impacted their molecular recognition properties. Exchanging glycolurils for aromatic walls imparted selectivity toward aromatic cations and UV/Vis and fluorescence activity. Flexible CB[n]-type receptors (e.g., glycoluril oligomers (16) and nor-seco-CB[n]) obtained by deletion of CH2 groups) display chiral recognition, homotropic allostery, and metal-ion-promoted folding and maintain high aqueous Ka values. Hexamer 6 is a synthon for (mono)functionalized CB[6] and CB[7] derivatives, which allows a merger of CB[n] with complex systems. For example, CB[7] can be augmented with biotin to create a targeted version of oxaliplatin, dyes for cellular imaging, PEG to non-covalently modify insulin, and appended to metal organic polyhedra to create stimuli-responsive hydrophobic nanospaces. CB[n] can be tailored for biomedical applications (e.g., as a solubilizing excipient for insoluble drugs or as an in vivo reversal agent) by deleting CH2 groups and exchanging glycolurils for o-xylylene walls bearing sulfonate groups to enhance solubility, promote clearance, and enhance binding affinity toward pharmaceuticals. Given the advances in CB[n] synthetic chemistry (Chapters 2, 18, 20), the potential applications of CB[n]-based systems are now virtually unlimited.

You do not currently have access to this chapter, but see below options to check access via your institution or sign in to purchase.
Don't already have an account? Register
Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal