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Pigmented cereal grains and millet contain a high concentration of flavonoids and phenolics (mainly anthocyanins),1–3  which are found in diverse anatomical locations of the kernel and contribute to the grain's color. Blue, purple, or a combination of colors are produced when anthocyanins (AC) are concentrated in the pericarp or aleurone layer. Flavonoids, such as flavones, reddish-colored phlobaphenes, yellow C-glycosides of proanthocyanidins, and flavanonols are concentrated in the grain's outer layer, but carotenoids, which contribute to the grain's yellow color, are concentrated in the endosperm.4  Numerous publications have linked AC and different phenolic compounds to antioxidant activities.2,3,5  Although the AC level of some types of colored cereals may approach that of some berries and grapes,6  research on grains is restricted.5,7,8  In the case of cereals, effective debranning techniques can yield anthocyanin-rich parts prior to milling.9  AC exhibit genetic diversity between species and genotypes. In the case of pigmented wheat, the highest AC content is seen in blue-aleurone soft wheat, followed by red- and purple-pericarp durum wheat.1,10  The standard roller method of milling removes most of their composition, because these chemicals are present in the grains' outer layer.1  Wheat's primary end products are pasta and bread. These are consumed daily, and one approach to enhance their health benefits may be by including wholemeal in their manufacture,11  owing to its high content of bioactive components. On the other hand, wholemeal goods contain bran, which may have a negative effect on their technological and sensory aspects, restricting their consumption. Indeed, numerous studies have established that bran has a typically negative impact on the quality of pasta and bread.12–14  A solution to this problem could be found by utilizing technological procedures that enable the recovery of proper milling fractions, or contemplating debranning to preserve external bioactive chemicals as a pre-milling step. Additionally, such processes must consider consumer safety, which may be jeopardized by the presence of pollutants.15,16 

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