Skip to Main Content
Skip Nav Destination

Organic–inorganic hybrids are materials consisting of two or more components combined at the molecular or nanometre level. They exhibit desirable properties of organic polymers such as toughness, elasticity and formability and the features of inorganic constituents such as hardness, strength and chemical resistance. Thus, organic–inorganic hybrids show superior parameters in comparison with those revealed by their unmodified counterparts. Depending on the synthetic strategy, the properties of hybrids can be tailored resulting in multifunctional materials suitable for several applications. Antimicrobial packaging is among the most promising ones. Active packaging materials delay microbial spoilage of packed products, maintain their quality and extend the shelf life. Moreover, they increase the safety of the consumer due to their preservative potential against food-borne pathogens. A combination of organic–inorganic hybrids with active agents results in functional materials exhibiting desirable mechanical and barrier properties, as well as showing antimicrobial activity.

You do not currently have access to this chapter, but see below options to check access via your institution or sign in to purchase.
Don't already have an account? Register
Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal