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One of the most significant challenges confronted by today's society is passing on a viable environment to future generations. Our environment is invariably deteriorating due to anthropogenic CO2 emanation, which has surpassed 400 ppm since 2015 (according to Team E. ESRL of Global Monitoring Division of Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network). Various industrial processes, natural-gas processing, and combustion of fuels are three major sources of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The carbon oxidation when fossil fuels are burnt produces the most CO2. The burning of fossil fuels in industrial facilities, oil refineries, and power plants is responsible for the oxidation. According to the report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), current worldwide CO2 emissions are dominated by the power and industrial sectors, accounting for about 60% of entire CO2 emissions. The intricacy of the matter is exacerbated by a plethora of elements, such as the relentless drive for economic development, the escalation of the world's population, and our dependency on fossil fuels. Since the commencement of the industrial revolution in the late 1700s, worldwide energy consumption has continued to grow, causing two main problems (1) with an estimated demand of 778 Etta Joule by 2035, there is a chance of depletion of limited fuel supplies1  and (2) the alarming increase of CO2 levels in the air, with a projected level of around 590 ppm by 2100 resulting in 1.9 °C increases in the global temperature.2  The Paris Agreement formed from investigations made by IPCC intends to minimize net CO2 concentrations by 2050 with the primary objective of strengthening the global response to the danger of climate change by keeping global temperature increase far below 2 °C over pre-industrial levels.3–5  This pact on climate change is a legally enforceable international agreement, which needs social and economic reform to address the climate challenges now and move forward relying on the most up-to-date science. The Paris Agreement is established on a cycle of five years of climate action. Countries outline the steps they plan to decrease emissions of greenhouse gas to fulfil the objectives of the Paris Agreement. Countries also outline the steps they plan to take to develop resilience and adaptation to the effects of increasing temperatures. Information on financial flows and adaptability may be included. In addition, the Paris Agreement established a set of guidelines for providing capacity-building, technical, and financial assistance to nations who require it. Beginning in 2024, countries will be required to report on their efforts in a transparent manner. A worldwide stocktake will be used to evaluate collective improvement under the Paris Agreement. This will lead to suggestions for countries in the following round to set more ambitious objectives. Some of the major features of the Paris Agreement are: temperature goal in the long term (Article 2); mitigation, ‘climate meutrality’ and global peaking (Article 4); reservoirs and sinks (Article 5); non-market-based and voluntary cooperation or market approaches (Article 6); adaptation (Article 7); damage and loss (Article 8); assistance with capacity development, technology, and finance (Article 9, 10 and 11); public engagement, awareness, training, education, and the public's accessibility to climate change information (Article 12); global stocktake (Article 14).

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