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The self-healing ability of tissues in living organisms is a classic example of naturally existing self-healing phenomena. Similarly, the ability of the lotus leaf to regenerate its dual-length topography and reinstate the hydrophobic wax coating after any physical/chemical damage has provided cues for the development of bio-inspired self-healing superhydrophobic materials to tackle the existing durability concerns and, therefore, enhance the shelf-life of the embedded superhydrophobicity. The general pathways for obtaining artificial self-healing superhydrophobicity are either (a) storage of the low surface energy molecules within the hierarchical topography that is capable of migrating to the physically damaged surface to restore the essential surface chemistry and thus reinstate the lost water repellency or (b) regeneration of the compromised rough surface features to restore the essential topography for retrieving superhydrophobicity. In a few cases, simultaneous regeneration of both the chemistry and topography has been reported, thus eliminating the dependence on either one of the factors (topography or chemistry) for obtaining self-healing extremely water-repellent materials for a wide range of practical applications. This chapter describes the different approaches adapted for designing healable superhydrophobicity.

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