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In multicellular organisms such as mammals, cells reside in a microenvironment which represents a noncellular component filling the interspace between cells, called the extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is present in all tissues and organs, playing important roles in tissue morphogenesis, cell growth, differentiation and survival as well as homeostasis through presentation of crucial biochemical and biomechanical cues.1  Fibrillar and non-fibrillar multi-adhesive proteins, proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans are the main components of the ECM with great variations in composition, mechanical properties and topography depending on the type of tissue.2  ECMs can be classified into two major types that vary...

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