Skip to Main Content
Skip Nav Destination

The interaction between molecules at surfaces is presented, showing landmarks and opportunities, with explanations of the systems as a whole. A general introduction concerning the nature of surfaces and interfaces is given, with emphasis on the very particular characteristics of this environment for the self-assembly of molecules and for molecular recognition processes. The fundamental ways that molecules can adsorb to a surface, by physisorption or chemisorption, and the characteristics of their assembly will be discussed. It will be shown that the particular balance between adsorbate–adsorbate and adsorbate–adsorbent interactions determines the outcome of the assembly process, in terms of structure, and therefore properties. The universal nature of the assembly methods means that they are applicable not only to flat surfaces, which are the focus here, but also to porous materials and particles. The idea of the interface as a supramolecular system will be emphasised, including the role of surface defects and the crystalline or amorphous nature of the substrate. Epitaxial and commensurate growth is introduced. It will be shown that interfaces are of prime importance for many fundamental phenomena in biology and applied systems in technology. The preparation of films containing multiple layers is required for many devices, and the growth of thin films using multiple techniques is presented.

You do not currently have access to this chapter, but see below options to check access via your institution or sign in to purchase.
Don't already have an account? Register
Close Modal

or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal